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An Introduction (Read 6896 times)
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An Introduction
21. Apr 2006 at 17:45
 
Scunthorpe (popularly known as Scunny) is the administrative centre of North Lincolnshire, England. It is also known as the 'Industrial Garden Town'. The town appears in the Domesday Book (1086) as Escumetorp, which is Old Norse for "Skuma's village". The current population is 62,000.
 
Ironstone was mined in the area as early as the Roman occupation, but the deposits lay forgotten until the 19th century. The rediscovery of iron ore in 1859 by Rowland Winn on the land of his father, Charles, resulted in the development of an iron and steel industry and rapid population growth. Iron ore was first mined in the Scunthorpe area in July 1860. Owing to the lack of a mainline railway the ore was transferred to a wharf at Gunness (or Gunhouse), initially by cart then by a narrow gauge railway, for distribution by barge or mainline rail from Keadby. Winn knew that the best way of exploiting the iron ore fields was for a rail link to be built from Keadby to Barnetby. He campaigned tirelessly for the link; construction work started in mid 1860 and was complete in 1864. He persuaded the Dawes brothers, to whose iron works the ore was being supplied, to build an iron works at the site of the iron ore fields at Scunthorpe. Constuction of Scunthorpe's first ironworks, the Trent Ironworks, began in 1862, with the first cast from the blastfurnace being tapped on 26 March 1864. Other ironwoks followed: building of the Frodingham Ironworks began in 1864; North Lincoln Ironworks in 1866; Redbourn Hill Iron & Coal Company in 1872; Appleby Ironworks blow in their first blastfurnace in 1876; and the last constructed being John Lysaght's Iron and Steel works in 1911, with production starting in 1912. Crude steel had been produced at Frodingham Ironworks in 1887 but this proved not to be viable. Maxmilian Mannaburg came to Frodingham Ironworks in 1889 to help build and run the steelmaking plant and on the night of 21 March 1890 the first steel was tapped. Rowland Winn is remembered in the town by three street names: Rowland Road, Winn Street & Oswald Road. Rowland Winn assumed the title Lord St. Oswald in 1885.
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