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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Alkborough  
The Location - The village stands on the cliff ridge over looking the point where the Rivers Trent & Ouse become the Humber.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as Alchebarge.

Other names - for the village include
Alchebarue, Hautebarg, Alke Bere and Awkeburgh.

The name - can be translated to 'the ridge-like cliff above the mooring pool of the river'. (Eminson) , alterntively 'wood or grave of a man called Alca'. (Mills)

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Althorpe
The Location - just south of Keadby on the of the West bank of the River Trent.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as
Aletorp.

The name - can be translated to
'Outlying farmstead or hamlet of a man called Ali or Alli'.
, alterntively 'Ali's secondary settlement' referring to nearby Keadby. (Cameron).


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Amcotts
The Location - within the Isle of Axholme situated on the west bank of the River Trent.
The Doomsday Book (1086)
referred to the village as "Amecotes".

Other names - for the village include

The name - can be translated to 'the cottage in the river bend'. (Emison), or "Amma's Cottages,huts" (Cameron).

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Appleby
The Location - situated on Ermine Street, five miles from Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Aplebi".

Other names - for the village include Appelbiea.


The name - can be translated to 'farmstead or village where apple trees grow'.

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Ashby
The Location - Ashby was one the 5 seperate villages which since 1936 became part of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Aschebi".

Other names - for the village include "Askebi".

The name - can be translated to "the farm settlement at the spring waters". Alternatively "the farmstead where the ash trees grow" or possibly "Aski's farmstead".

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Barnetby
The Location - on the northern edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds approximately eight miles south of the River Humber.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Bernodebi".

Other names - for the village include Bernedebi, Bernetebi & Bernetteby.

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead or village of a man named Beornnoth'.

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Barrow-upon-Humber
The Location - three miles east of Barton.

In 737-40 the village was referred to as
"Bwaruwe".

Other names - for the village include Bearwe, Beruwe & Barewe upon Humbre.

The name - can be translated to 'the wood or grove by the River Humber'.

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Barton-upon-Humber
The Location - On the South Bank of the River Humber.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Bertune".

Other names - for the town include Bartuna, Baertun.

The name - can be translated to 'the barley farm, the outlying grange by the River Humber'. No doubt so named in relation to Barrow upon Humber.

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Belton
The Location - in the Isle of Axholme just to the north of Epworth.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Beltone".

The name - can be translated to 'a farmstead or village on a piece of dry ground in a fen or marsh'.


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Bonby
The Location - The village lies on the western edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds, six miles from Barton.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Bundebi".

Other names - for the village include "Bondebi and Bondby".

The name - can be translated to "Farmstead or village of the peasant farmer", alternatively "Bondi's farmstead, village".

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Bottesford
The Location - The village is just south of Scunthorpe.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Budlesforde".

Other names - for the village include Bulesforde, Botlesforda, Botelesforde & Botenesford.

The name - can be translated to "a ford by the house or building" a ford being 'a tract of shallow water'. referring to Bottesford Beck.
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Brigg
The Location -   ten miles to the east of Scunthorpe.
In 1183 Brigg was referred to as "Glandford" & in 1318 "Glaunford Brigge".

Other names - for the town include Glamfordbrigges.

The name - can be translated to "a bridge".

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Broughton
The Location - eight miles to the east of Scunthorpe.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Bertone".

Other names - for the village include Bergton, Broghton and Braughton.

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead by a hill or mound'.

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Burringham
The Location - on the east bank of the River Trent five miles from Crowle.

In 1196 the village was referred to as "Burengham".

Other names - for the village include Buringeham, Burringeham & Burningham.

The name - can be translated to 'homestead of the dwellers on the stream' (Mills), alternatively 'homestead, estate of the Burgredinga or the Burgricingas'. (Cameron).

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Burton upon Stather
The Location - on the cliff over the east bank of the River Trent around four miles west of Winterton.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the town as "Burtone".

Other names - for the village include Bertona & Burtonestathel.

The name - can be translated to 'fortified farmstead by the landing place'. - Stather is the Danish word for 'landing place'

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Cadney
The Location - is 2 miles south of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086)
referred to the village as "Catenai".

Other names - for the village include Cadenai, Kadenei and Kadnay.

The name - can be translated to "island or dry ground in marsh, of a man called Cada".


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Castlethorpe
The Location - is 2 miles west of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086)
referred to the village as "Castorp".

Other names - for the village include Cheistorp, Kaistoro, Keistorp.

The name - can be translated to either a byname Keikr or Keiss. Thorp is "a secondary settlement" to possibly Broughton.


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Crosby
The Location - Crosby was one the 5 seperate villages which since 1936 became part of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Cropesbi"

Other names - for the village include Crosseby.

The name - can be translated to "village with a cross", alternatively "the farm settlement at the creek stream of the valley cutting".

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Crowle
The Location -   10 mile west of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as
"Crul".

Other names - for the village include Crull.

The name - could have originated from a Dutch word "Krul" which means a small settlement, alternatively, "Croc" meaning a winding river.

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Croxton
The Location -   7 miles north east of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Croxestone".

Other names - for the village include Crokeston, Crochestune & Crocston.

The name - can be translated to 'Croc's farmstead or village'.

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Dragonby
The Location -   1 mile north of Scunthorpe.
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Ealand
The Location -   1 mile south of Crowle .
In 1310 the village was referred to as "Aland".

Other names - for the village include "Ealonde".

The name - can be translated to "tract of land near a river or stream".

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East Butterwick
The Location -   five miles east of Epworth on the east bank of the River Trent opposite West Butterwick .
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Butruic".

Other names - for the village include
Butrewich, Buttirwic, Buterewic, Boterwic, Buterwic, Butterwyck, Estbuterwyk

The name - can be translated to 'dairy farm where butter is made'. East in relation to West Butterwick on the opposite side of the Trent Bank.

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East Halton
The Location -  Seven miles south east of Barton and one mile from the River Humber.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Haltune".

Other names - for the village include Esthalton, Haltone

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead or village in a nook or corner of land'.

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Eastoft
The Location -   situated three and a half miles northeast of Crowle.

The name - can be translated to 'homestead with a small enclosure to the east of Crowle'. "toft" in Danish was a word for homestead with a small enclosure.


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Elsham
The Location -   4 mile North East of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Eleham".

Other names - for the village include "Elesham".

The name - can be translated to "Homestead or village of a man called Elli".

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Epworth
The Location -  6 miles South of Crowle & 9 mile South West of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Epeurde".

Other names - for the village include "Appewrd" and "Epeward" .

The name - can be translated to "Eppe" meaning a side valley and "worth" meaning a farm settlement , "Appewrd" may indicate a Danish influence - "appe" meaning a bog or swamp.


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Flixborough
The Location - situated to the north of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Flichesburg".

Other names - for the village include Flikesburg, Flyxburgh and Flixburrow.

The name - can be translated to 'fortified dwelling on the cliff slope'.

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Garthorpe
The Location -  two miles west of Burton Stather.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Gerulftorp".

Other names - for the village include
Gerold'torp, Gerlethorp,Gerlthorp & Gerthorp.

The name - can be translated to 'outlying farmstead or hamlet of a man called Geirulf or Gairulf'.

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Goxhill
The Location -   5 miles East of Barton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Gosle".

Other names - for the village include
Gosla, Gausa, Gousle, Gousel & Gousele.

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Gunness
The Location - the east bank of the River Trent where Keadby Bridge crosses the river.
In 1199 the village was referred to as "Gunnesse".

The name - can be translated to 'headland of a man called Gunni'.

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Hibaldstow
The Location - four miles south of Brigg .
From 1066-87 the village was referred to as Hibaldestowa".

Other names - for the village include Hiboldestou(e).

The name - can be translated to ''holy place where St Hygbald is buried'.

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Holme
 
Horkstow
The Location -   2 miles South of the River Humber on the northwestern edge of the Wolds.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Horchetou".

Other names - for the village include Orkestowe, Horkystow and Horkestoo.

The name - can be translated to 'a shelter for animals or people'.


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Keadby
The Location - in the Isle of Axholme on the western bank of the River Trent.
In 1184 the village was referred to as "Ketebi".

The name - can be translated to 'Kaeti's to Keti's farmstead,(Cameron), 'settlement at the mooring haven' (Eminson)

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Kirmington
The Location -  seven miles north of Caistor and seven miles north east of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Cherintone".

Other names - for the village include
Chernigtuna, Chirringtune, Kirningtun, Kirningeton & Kermintton.

The name - can be translated to 'estate associated with a man called Cynehere'.

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Kirton-in-Lindsey
The Location -   8 miles southwest of Brigg.
Between 1070-87 the village was referred to as "Chirchetone".

Other names - for the village include
Chirchetune., Kirchetona, Chirketone, Kirketona.

The name - can be translated to " a village with a church".

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Luddington
The Location -   located on the east side of the Old River Don around five miles north east of Crowle.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Ludintone".

Other names - for the village include Ludinton.

The name - can be translated to 'estate associated with a man called Luda'.

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Manton
The Location -   Overlooking Scunthorpe just South of Twigmoor Woods.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Mameltune".

Other names - for the village include Malmetuna, Maunton and Mawton

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead on sandy or chalky ground'.

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Melton Ross
The Location -   five miles north east of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Medeltone".

Other names - for the village include Meltuna, Miauton and Meelton Roos.

The name - can be translated to 'middle farmstead', Ross from the de Ros family who had connections with the village in the 14th century.


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Messingham
The Location -  3 miles south of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Maessingham".

Other names - for the village include Messingeham.

The name - can be translated to
" the homestead or estate of Maessingas"
.

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New Holland
The Location -   4 miles East of Barton on the south bank of the River Humber.
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Normanby
The Location -   3 miles North of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as
"Normannebi".

Other names - for the village include
Normanebi, Nordmanabi.


The name - can be translated to " a farmstead or village of the Northmen or Norwegians".

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Owston Ferry
The Location -   along side the River Trent in the Isle of Axholme.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Ostone"

Other names - for the village include Ouston.

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead, village to the east (of Haxey)'.

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Raventhorpe
The Location -   about two miles south east of Scunthorpe.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Ragenaltorp"

Other names - for the village include
Ragnaldtorp, Ragheniltorp, Ranildethorp, Ragnaldtorp.

The name - can be translated to "Ragnald's secondary settlement"


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Redbourne
The Location -   about six miles south west of Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Redburne, Radburne"

Other names - for the village include
Ratburne, Ratburna, Redburna.

The name - can be translated to 'the village at the haven roadstead of the red burn', alternatively " a reedy stream"


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Roxby
The Location -   situated a mile south west of Winterton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Roxebi".

Other names - for the village include
Rochesberia, Rokesbia & Rochesbi.


The name - can be translated to 'farmstead or village of a
man called Hrokr'.


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Sandtoft
Santon
 
Saxby All Saints
The Location -   three miles south of the river humber on the westside of the wolds.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Saxebi".

Other names - for the village include "Saxbi".

The name - can be translated to 'Saxi's farmstead or village'. All Saints is from the dedication of the parish church.

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Scawby / Scawby Brook
The Location -   three miles from Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Scalebi".

Other names - for the village include "Scallebi",

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead of a man called Skalli' (Mills). 'farm settlement at the mooring waters of the river pools' (Eminson).

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Scunthorpe
The Location -   Situated in the Heart of North Lincolnshire.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Escumetorp"

Other names - for the village include
Scumetorp, Scummptorp, Scumthorp.

The name - can be translated to "Skuma's secondary settlement" , named in relation to Frodingham.

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South Ferriby
The Location -   located on the south bank of the River Humber at the northern end of the Lincolnshire Wolds.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Ferebi".

Other names - for the village include Suth Feriby

The name - can be translated to 'The farmstead or village at the ferry'. It is South in contrast to North Ferriby which is located on the opposite bank of the River Humber.


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South Killingholme
The Location -   2 miles west from the banks of the River Humber.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Cheluingeholm".

Other names - for the village include
Chiluingeholm, Kiluingeholm, Killingeholm Kiluingholm.

The name - can be translated to "the family, the dependents of Ceolwulf".

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Thornton Curtis
The Location -  five miles south east of Barton and four miles south of New Holland.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Torentune".

Other names - for the village include
Torntune, Thorentona, Thorneton & Thornton Curteys,


The name - can be translated to 'the farmstead or village where thorn trees grow'. (Curtis is unknown).


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Ulceby
The Location -   six miles south of New Holland and eight south east of Barton.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Ulvesbi".

Other names - for the village include Hulesbi, Wlsebi and Olesbi.

The name - can be translated to 'Ulf's farmstead or village'.

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West Butterwick
The Location -   western bank of the River Trent opposite East Butterwick four miles north east of Epworth.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Butruic".

Other names - for the village include
Butrewich, Buttirwic, Buterewic, Boterwic, Buterwic, Butterwyck, Westbuterwyk


The name - can be translated to 'dairy farm where butter is made'. West in relation to East Butterwick on the opposite side of the Trent Bank.

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West Halton
The Location -  situated about a mile north west of Winterton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Haltone".

Other names - for the village include "Hauton".

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead in a nook or corner of land'.

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Westwoodside
The Location -   just west of Haxey.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Westude".

The name - can be translated to "wooded area of land to the west of Haxey".

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Whitton
The Location -   located on the River Humber five miles north of Winterton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Witenai".

Other names - for the village include Whytten (1321) and Wytton (1535).

The name - can be translated to 'white island'.

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Winterton
The Location -   five miles north of Scunthorpe & eight miles southwest of Barton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Wintringatune".

Other names - for the village include
Wintrintune, Wintri(n)tone, Wintretune & Wintringtuna.


The name - can be translated to " the family , the dependents of Winter or Wintra".

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Winteringham
The Location - two miles north of Winterton.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Wintringeham".

Other names - for the village include

The name - can be translated to 'homestead of the family or followers of a man called Winter or Wintra'.


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Wootton
The Location -   six miles south east of Barton and six miles south of New Holland.

The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Udetune".

Other names - for the village include

The name - can be translated to 'farmstead or village in a wood or tract of woodland'.

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Worlaby
The Location - on the western edge of the Wolds near Brigg.
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as "Uluricebi" or "Vluricebi".

Other names - for the village include Wulfrikeby, Wolrickby and Werliby.

The name - can be translated to 'Wulfric's farmstead or village'.

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Wrawby
The Location -   two miles to the east of Brigg
The Doomsday Book (1086) referred to the village as
"Waragebi".

Other names - for the village include
Wragebi, Wragheby & Wraweby.

The name - can be translated to
"Wraghi's farmstead. village".


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Wroot
The Location -   furthest point west of the historic county of Lincolnshire.
In the 12th Century the village was refered to as " Wroth".

Other names - for the village include
Wrot & Wrote.


The name - can be translated to
'snout-like spur of land'.


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